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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
. one key concern is profitability, and i think one thing about steve jobs, we always saw him put out products and he had a minimum 10% margin on it. we'll see if this new apple without steve jobs has that same discipline. i hope it does, and if it does it will be a great stock for a long time. >> so, in other words, i think i hear you both saying put money to work in tech next week. >> tech has been one of the worst performing groups over the last year actually because of multiple compression. not so much that the earnings were bad. in fact, you know the s&p earnings were only up 2.6% for the year, and yet the market was up 16. it's really due to valuations increasing. technology had the opposite happen, so the bigger companies are extremely cheap. actually historically cheap, and as long as they have growth, and they do, greater than the average growth of the s&p, they are all buys. >> yeah. >> but, dave -- >> robert? >> yeah. i would say there's some tech companies that are really destroying value. hewlett-packard, dell, microsoft, not creating value anymore. in fact, it's a utilit
that might have prosecutorial merit. in december 2011, steve kroft reported on two such cases. we begin with a woman named eileen foster, a former senior executive at countrywide financial, one of the epicenters of the crisis. >> do you believe that there are people at countrywide who belong behind bars? >> yes. >> do you want to give me their names? >> no. >> would you give their names to a grand jury if you were asked? >> yes. >> but eileen foster has never been asked, and never spoken to the justice department, even though she was countrywide's executive vice president in charge of fraud investigations. at the height of the housing bubble, countrywide financial was the largest mortgage lender in the country, and the loans it made were among the worst, a third ending up in foreclosure or default, many because of mortgage fraud. it was foster's job to monitor and investigate allegations of fraud against countrywide employees and make sure they were reported to the board of directors and the treasury department. >> how much fraud was there at countrywide? >> from what i saw, the types o
in today's "closing bell" exchange by hank smith and steve from comcast funds and our own rick santelli. >> hello. >> good to see you guys. >> thank you so much for joining us. >> hank smith, we haven't heard from you in a while. let me kick this off with you. how are you investing going into all of these earnings coming out from the banks this week as ahead of that debt ceiling debate? >> sure, maria. our equity portfolios are fully invested. we see no reason 2013 can't deliver very similar returns as 2012 did. the fact is we still have a good fundamental backdrop. the economy is expanding. it's not contracting or growing. value sheets are strong and valuations are very attractive so what is there not to like? >> you're our resident skeptic today, and i would point not to the normal averages that we quote every day, but look at the dow transportation average which could close at an all-time high today. the transportation companies, often a leading indicator for the economy. if they are doing well. chances are the economy is going to get better. wouldn't that make you want to buy stocks
about winn? nonetheless, steve wynn has put a lot of resources into macau, the vegas of china. things are getting better over there. i think wynn's a buy. then there's companies like boeing, which rallied despite terrible press. all of these companies that expanded rapidly around the globe and they have been roaring despite no research-oriented news that would make you feel all warm and fuzzy about the numbers. you can even consider dell part of this trend. yes, dell, the big service company that has been hurt by this rapid expansion at a time when no one trusted overseas markets. now dell might actually go private. ♪ hallelujah and it would make sense because half of dell's revenue comes from overseas. big companies with exposure to europe is doing terrifically. both have been kept back by worries. both ceos have said over and over, it's an issue. how about ford and general motors? have you seen these two? ford may have the best chart in the book. it's screaming. company doubled its dividend and getting european losses under control while china and latin america turned the corner.
grove, craig barrett, titans. go back to the steve jobs, talking about the stodgy intel. there's a funny moment where andy grove basically told him to shut up. but there is a sense that intel didn't move fast enough. at one point they're talking about, listen, our battery life will start exceeding the arm. put on your apple hat, all right? they would rather do business with samsung's chip, even though samsung is their biggest competitor, than switch to intel. >> what are we missing? there's uniform negativity here. we'll look back on it at end of this year and say, wait a second, we should have thought of that. >> don't throw that. >> that pc was bad, and they had every right to go out the window. all right, i've calmed down. >> there's no hope? >> anytime you have that budget, you can do it. i like stacy very much. it's a great manufacturer. there's hope. >> okay. >> there's hope. same level of hope. silver lining theory i call it. >> okay. when we come back, a wall street analyst known for being a longtime bear on netflix. and from textbook reynolds to the linked-in for college student
this as they contemplate cutting funds for social security and medicare? an economist with ftn joins us and steve liesman, of course, our own senior economics reporter. good to see you both. lindsey, what kind of a threat is this to the economy? how do you see this? pretty scary stuff actually. >> i really don't see this as that big of a threat to the u.s. economy. i think this store sea little misleading talking about 401(k)s being drained by 5 25%. what this is 25% of new money. on net we're still seeing over 200 billion flow in on an annual basis to 401(k)s, a soyuzable amount of savings and it indicates that individuals look at 401(k)s as a vital vehicle for retirement savings. plus, that 25% is not just cash withdrawals, also loans against the balance, and in some cases it makes perfect sense to borrow against your 401(k). for example, if you're thinking about purchasing a car, taking out an auto loan, why wouldn't you borrow against your 401(k), you end up paying yourself back on the interest on the loan. >> i think that's crazy. i think that's absolutely nuts. where is your retirement money if you
? steve liesman has more on that. steve. >> the questions are not easy. they again into sell mandics and have everything to do with if the debt ceiling is solved, and if only for investors, the most important part, what's the economic impact? let's look at some of the rhetoric. the debt ceiling, is it a real tragedy or soap opera? what we have done is graduate the screen from blue over to red, democrat ideas on this side, red on this side. democrats right now hitting the debt ceiling, not raising it. so some republicans say it's manageable. on that issue carl mentioned of default, any missed government employees, that would constitute a default. others are say no, no, we're not paying off the debt itself, that's what default is. on another critical issue, could the government prioritize its payments, take the payments, the cash that's coming in and use it to pay a certain number of things? on this side,ed article mrgs is saying no authority to prioritize, and no ability, and the treasury have different payment systems. republicans say yes, and in fact they're working on a bill right
. these guys, they remind me of steve jobs used to call these press conferences. and you say, you know ha he's going to do? he's going to unveil x and it turns out to be 10x. is mark zuckerburg capable of that amount of surprise? i don't know. >> he actually came up with the goods. >> it's so exciting. >> i have no idea, all i know is they've got a lot of shareholders who are much happier than they were not long ago. one harkens back to the week when it went public. think of morgan stanley, the criticism that firm took as a result of that ipo. the ceo said give us a year, let's see where things stand. maybe he'll end up looking better. >> would you use a video messaging product on facebook if we got that? >> well, i wouldn't. >> are you on facebook? >> no, i am not. >> that would be a bainier. >> however, i'm sure many would. >> i think so. 1 billion users. >> some sort of a voiceover ip, skype, they would go there, microsoft bought skype, or at least had looked at it, would they go down that road. i don't know. we'll see. >> they've done a good job of keeping the lid on it. nothing's leaked
, including our own rick santelli and steve liesman. it's all about the fiscal cliff in that report, isn't it? >> taken by itself not a bad report, moderate to modest growth, real estate not doing too badly. all the comments, i didn't finish counting them up, but the word fiscal and uncertainty both appear several times in the beige book, and the clear impression, bill, is that uncertainty over the fiscal situation is already hurting the economy, delaying hiring plans, capital investment plans and really everything from auto dealers in cleveland to farmers down in texas have cited the fiscal cliff as a major concern. that's something that's influencing their decision making right now. >> you would expect that given the fact that everybody is in lockdown mode as we wait to figure out what our tax rates are going to be, where the spending cuts are going to be, that it is going to impact the economy. my question is how much of an m impact going to see earnings? are they going to get hit? >> that's the key to the whole thing. as we said, the beige book numbers, when they came out there were cent
. >> in today's "closing bell" exchange. carol roth author of "the entrepreneur equation" and steve saks and michael from janney montgomery smith. good to have you here. let me start with you, scott. what do you think about this move? are we going to get more of this? is this just the beginning, or are we in for pullbacks considering what could be coming to washington the next couple of months? >> i think pullbacks are norm a. let's face it, the last couple of months have been a big party. ben bernanke invited us and i don't think the punch bowl goes away. >> the fed is the key issue right now. does that trump the fundamentals, all the earnings we're getting, you pay more attention to the fed? >> you think we have low growth and quite frankly investors are starved for air. they have been holding their breath for four years. there is no oxygen in any other market. there's no place to go for yield. therefore, essentially i think ben is terroristing it to the point to where they got to jump into risk assets and that's what we're seeing. >> david, does that make you bullish as well? >> david
't know if it's going to be a one more thing moment when we grew accustomed to with steve jobs. but mr. zuckerberg has left the stage with what he calls graft search, only available in english today. much more work to be done on that. we've seen facebook sell off in the wake of the news. it's interesting in the context of the conversation youer having sue gives moto the very well respected text blog. they have a headline out that says facebook just declared war on google. meet your new search engine. that's how at least that influential blog is spinning the story and it plays to what david was mentioned. >> yeah. you keep stressing this could be good for microsoft as well. why? you were explaining there was a default. >> microsoft has been a source of it. they have a very close partnership which continues to improve, by the way. so, you know, they haven't described all the details of how this is going to work, but if you're going to go to the search box on facebook looking for what your friends like in laguna beach or what surfers like and you don't get what you're looking for, you're
big thing. we're going to welcome steve blank to the set right after this break. this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. >>> welcome back to "squawk box" this morning. our next guest was a serial en
committee, steve scalise from louisiana. so we're going to be a deadbeat nation and this is important, republicans are anti-old folks, anti-young people, anti-sick people. all of those horrible things. what's year you action, sir? >> you know, it just sad this is what president obama is going to become in his second term. he seems to be the only person in washington that wants to talk about the nation defaulting on its debt. i think there's nothing that could be more irresponsible for somebody to suggest that america would default. i don't want us to do that. but just remember the debt ceiling the fact that we're hitting up against this max on our credit card again is a symptom of the spending problem in washington and president obama doesn't want to recognize that that problem exists. >> when you say no one is talking about defaulting on the debt, does that also include letting the debt ceiling lapse? >> well, you know, larry, what we're once again up on the debt ceiling. we have been here before, a year and half ago we were having this debate again. i supported a plan cut cap and ba
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in chicago. steve liesman is in studio. steve, one thing on the daily news, charlie sheen is going to be a grabbndfather. isn't he 47? >> anthony weiner. anthony weiner still spending money out of his campaign account. >> that's legal, right, in the state of new york? >> it is, lawyers and fees. >> among other things. if i see an article about anthony weiner, i read it because of the bell. >> joe is stalling for time. we have 31 seconds. >> i could have asked you a question. i'm saving viewers from one of your answers to a question. i'm kidding. what are we looking for in the cp cpi. >> i will tell michele. i'm note talking to you, joe. it's supposed to be unchanged, food and energy, inflation for the miami is not the problem, if it's the problem now. >> because we're winning! ric rick. >> here we go. survey says unchanged on headline, just as steve pointed out, as expected. strip out the all important food and energy, we're up .1, we look at year-over-year, headline up 1.7, a tenth lighter than last year expectations of 1.8. just spot on year-over-year, food and energy at 1.9. tha
stay there and get some more commentary on these numbers. steve liesman is here on set. john writing is chief economist at rdq economics. steve a lot of numbers to run through. >> yeah. >> retail sales a little better than expected. bad news is the empire state numbers. >> we've had weakness there, and the weakness remains, and the problem i'm having right now, becky, is the drawing an income chart of the two guys on my side and this big dip that would happen with me in the middle here. i'm incredibly focused on that. >> leverage. >> i'd be part of the mean. vehicle sales had a good month. this is the number that will give us the final tally on the christmas sales. and at least for a moment, settle the debate. that's before the revisions. over what kind of christmas it was. and it's not looking too shabby. 0.4 revision for november. trying to look at the core sales were 0.6. so that's not too bad, either. and then 0.6 as well in december. the ppi under control, 1.3% year over year. rick said. and maybe just bring in john riding here. john, two things. one is the how good a christmas
. let's get to steve liesman who has a report on the debt ceiling. >> andrew, thanks. we want to look at the economic effects of the debt ceiling. kind of in context with what each party is saying about it and how investors might put it into a matrix to make up their minds about what is really going to happen with the question. is it a real tragedy or a soap opera? if you look up here, we've graduated this there blue to red, meaning democrat on this, republican on that side. you know, the democrats are starting to say if you go over the debt ceiling, you hit it, calamitous. and you have other words from damaging to manageable, republicans saying we can do this for awhile and it will be okay. i want to look at specific issues here. democrats say any missed government payment is a default. republicans say, no, only when you don't pay the interest on the debt. how about on the issue of can the government prioritize payments so that the incoming cash equals the outgoing cash? really the republicans -- i'm sorry, democrats saying no authority to do this and really no ability to program our
, it depends which one has the bigger problem at any point in the day. >> steve, thank you very much for joining us. >> my great pleasure. thank you. >> 47 million in 2012. he stays in california, tax bill is $29 million. so if he moved to florida, he would save $6.25 million. >> the tax bill is 29 million? >> 29 million out of 47. that's not bad. that's pretty good. but he could move to florida and keep half, basically keep half instead of keeping 18 out of 47. >> for a guy who is on the road a lot of the time. >> and then the asteroid thing, i saw what al rockier was able to -- he got a lot of mileage out of that story. >> so are you about to make a confession? >> it's not really true. today i'm feeling fine. coming up, i'm going to start being more open. >> more open? i know everything about you. >> to viewers. >> our viewers know just about everything, too. >> if i feel like i have to burp, i am going to -- >> you are not a closed book. >> could you be more open than al roker about something? >> probably not. >> probably not. so every little thing happens to me. >> oh, boy, viewe
the internet, brought in by steve jobs in 2003 and given those generous stock options because back then that's what apple stock was trading at. 7 and change. not 700 and change. $7 and change. gore's obviously a patient man waiting so long. is he suddenly buying on dips? well, the options had to be exercised by this march. after ten years, and just in time he got some fast cash. as you mentioned, he netted a reported $100 million in the half billion dollar sale of current tv to al jazeera. "forbes" jokes, quote, i guess the check from al jazeera must have cleared and the man who was worth $2 million in 2000 is now worth $300 million, richer than myth romney but nowhere nearly as rich as michael bloomberg at 25 billion and he's only a mayor. maria and bill, back to you. >> he should have done it last year before the fiscal cliff when the taxes went up. >> actually al gore was pushing them to do the deal before the year closed because he wanted to get the 15% rather than 20. >> missed out. thank you, jane. >> back with the closing countdown. moving higher here. the dow is up 38. >>> it was a w
on cnbc. i'm steve kroft. precious commodities are, by definition, rare, valuable, and in high demand, and very often they're located in places that are difficult to reach and sometimes dangerous. this edition features stories that take us down into the world of sharks, deep into the heart of africa, and onto the high seas for a look at the dark side of big-time commercial fishing. we begin with gold. there's a demand for gold for investments, for the circuits in cell phones and computers, and of course for jewelry. and mining it often comes at a huge cost, one of which you probably haven't heard very much about. in the democratic republic of congo, gold and other minerals are fueling the deadliest conflict since world war ii. in november of 2009, scott pelley went to the heart of central africa and found a campaign of rape and murder being largely funded by gold that's exported to the world. >> this is a gold mine in eastern congo, dug from the side of a mountain by the bare hands and stooped backs of 100 men. they've lifted tons of dirt one pan at a time, building terraces as they d
there. periodically getting a new story. we have maria over there, and steve liesman, i mean, it's really -- we're bringing out the big guns. we've got the bazookas there. >> yes, we do. yes, we do. >> it's big. >> it is big. a couple of years ago is when the arab springs started, we were in davos. >> that's right. >> all right. microsoft's there. bombers under fire again. he's under fire constantly. >> it's been a long time. >> let's get a look at the opening bell here in a few seconds. the s&p, as you know, an interesting day, a bit of a run-up here on friday afternoon. let's see how that translates into today's session. at the big board, celebrating the ipo which happens on friday. nasdaq, another ipo from friday, a global enterprise center provider. among the more interesting stories in the papers today, david, deconstruction of what led to the autonomy. interesting color. >> those are always fascinating to read. great reporting by the journal. just in terms of understanding the decision-making, or lack thereof, the directors of the ceo, the pressure he felt he was under. and
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)